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Bird name:

Robin

Erithacus rubecula

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Chats and Old World Flycatchers (Muscicapidae)

BTO 2

R.

BTO 5

ROBIN

Euring 5

10990
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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

UK Conservation Status


Green Status

European Conservation Status


Conservation Description


The Robin is resident in much of the UK, Isle of Man, and Ireland. It has a "Green" status because of its large, stable population.

SUMMARY

Overview

Robin: Familiar bird with a bright orange-red face, neck and breast and olive-brown upperparts. Narrow band of grey separates the red and brown. Underparts are buff to white. Black bill, dark brown legs and feet. They may sing through the night, which leads to them being confused with Nightingales.


Range and Habitat

Robin: Resident in the UK and Ireland. Most are sedentary. Some British birds move south to the Iberian peninsula in the fall, while others from northern Europe arrive on Britain's east coast for the winter. Resides in woods, thickets, hedges, parks and gardens. Also may be found in open country.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"tik", "tik-tik-tik"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Robin shown "feathering its nest" in the "Spoonful of Sugar" sequence in Mary Poppins was the unrelated American species.
  • It was chosen by public ballot to be the national bird of the UK in the 1960s.
  • An English folk tale says that it used to be solid brown, and when Jesus was dying on the cross, it went and sang to him. Blood from his wounds stained his breast, and from then on all Robins had a red breast.
  • A group of robins are collectively known as a "worm" of robins.

RELATED BIRDS

RANGE MAP


FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Artist

Michael Oberhofer

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
4 and 6 letter alpha codesX

The four letter common name alpha code is is derived from the first two letters of the common first name and the first two letters of common last name. The six letter species name alpha code is derived from the first three letters of the scientific name (genus) and the first three letters of the scientific name (species). See (1) below for the rules used to create the codes..

Four-letter (for English common names) and six-letter (for scientific names) species alpha codes were developed by Pyle and DeSante (2003, North American Bird-Bander 28:64-79) to reflect A.O.U. taxonomy and nomenclature (A.O.U. 1998) as modified by Supplements 42 (Auk 117:847-858, 2000) and 43 (Auk 119:897-906, 2002). The list has been updated by Pyle and DeSante to reflect changes reported by the A.O.U from 2003 through 2006.

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ITIS CodesX

The Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) was established in the mid-1990 s as a cooperative project among several federal agencies to improve and expand upon taxonomic data (known as the NODC Taxonomic Code) maintained by the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

To find the ITIS page for a bird species go to the ITIS web site advanced search and report page at http://www.itis.gov/advanced_search.html. You can enter the TSN or the common name of the bird. It will return the ITIS page for that bird. Another way to obtain the ITIS page is to use the Google search engine. Enter the string ITIS followed by the taxonomic ID, for example "ITIS 178041" will return the page for the Allen's Hummingbird.

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Parts of a Standing birdX
Head Feathers and MarkingsX
Parts of a Flying birdX